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August 2015 Health Newsletter

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» Painkillers Like Ibuprofen Increase Risk for Stroke and Heart Attack
» Study Links Inactivity to Diabetes
» Soon Many Restaurant Menus Must Have Calorie Counts

Painkillers Like Ibuprofen Increase Risk for Stroke and Heart Attack

Studies have shown that over-the-counter NSAID pain killers like Ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, and naproxen can potentially cause users to have a heart attack or a stroke. New labeling being required by the US Food and Drug Administration on the packaging of NSAIDS will warn users of these possible side effects, along with advising them that their risk of heart failure is increased if they take these drugs. The new labels will include the fact that these heart problems can occur as soon as the initial weeks of use of the NSAIDS. They will also say that heart failure, heart attack, and stroke can affect people using NSAIDS who have no history of heart issues, and no genetic predisposition toward heart disease. People who already have heart issues or who have certain risk factors for heart disease have a higher probability of suffering heart failure, heart attacks, or strokes with NSAID usage, though. Studies seem to show that higher doses of NSAIDS increase possible heart failure or damage. NSAIDS have been used for years to treat fever as well as the pain from arthritis, headaches, abdominal cramping, and the discomfort from viral diseases.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: FDA.gov, online July 9, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Study Links Inactivity to Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is an ever-increasing and insidious health risk. Studies in the past have linked the lack of physical activity to the risk of becoming diabetic. A new study conducted by Gibbs and his colleagues on 2,027 overweight people between the ages of 38 and 50 showed a definite correlation between a lack of daily physical activity and the increased risk of diabetes. Although certain elements of the study were critiqued by other professionals, the overall feeling was that the study once again demonstrated that being sedentary for up to 10 hours per day was a definitive factor in being at risk for developing diabetes. The study supported the benefits of a healthy, active lifestyle as well as a lifestyle that limits inactivity. People who were sedentary for a minimum of 10 hours per day were more than twice as likely to end up with glucose tolerance issues leading to diabetes than people whose daily sedentary time was less than 6 hours per day. The study suggests that people with daily sedentary behavior can reduce their risk of developing glucose intolerance impairment and subsequently developing diabetes by adding a regimen of daily physical activity to their behavior.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Diabetes Care, online July 8, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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Soon Many Restaurant Menus Must Have Calorie Counts

Given a year's delay of their deadline, chain restaurants with 20 plus outlets breathed a collective sigh of relief when advised by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration they would be given an extra year to comply with a ruling that they had to include calorie counts with their menus. With more than a third of all American adults being obese, the regulation was put into effect to give restaurant goers a chance to limit the fat and sugar-filled foods they ingest. The regulation to put calorie counts on all menus and menu boards extends to restaurants where patrons are seated, where take-out is offered, bakeries, ice cream parlors, movie theaters, amusement parks, and pizza places (whose labeling must include both slices and whole pizzas). It also includes grocery stores with eat-in sections such as Whole Foods, and large vending machine meal operations. It excludes drinks concocted and served at a bar or nightclub. The FDA's rules are an integral part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act passed by the Obama administration. Panera Bread Company was the first to comply with the ruling, and they found that their patrons changed their eating habits by switching to lower calorie meals. McDonalds and Starbucks Corporations have also complied to date.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Reuters, online July 9, 2015
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2015


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